Asian Americans Advancing Justice - LA

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Episode 4: Generation Rising

During a time of the war and social tumult, a young generation fights for equality both in the fields and on campuses to claim a culture and new identity of their own: Asian Americans. The aftermath of the Vietnam War introduces new immigrants and refugees who further expand the definition of who is Asian American.

Lesson Plan
Grades 9-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
This lesson explores the experiences and contributions of Filipino American farmworkers in the fields of California’s Central Valley during the mid-1960s.

Grades 9-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
This lesson explores some of the ways in which Asian Americans in the military experienced the war in Vietnam and the ways they negotiated their identities with being seen by both sides as “foreign invaders.”

Grades 7-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
This lesson focuses on the birth of Ethnic Studies through the two longest student strikes in the country’s history, led by youth of color forming the Third World Liberation Front (TWLF) at San Francisco State University and University of California, Berkeley.

Grades 6-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
During the 1970s, arts and culture became vehicles for elevating the narratives of Asian Americans, a term first used in 1968 during the struggle to establish ethnic studies at San Francisco State College. Under this new pan-Asian identity, a generation of young Asian American organizers, academics, and artists emerged and ready to define themselves and their history to the rest of America.

Grades 7-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
With the United States and the Soviet Union in a Cold War, fears of Southeast Asia falling to communism led to America’s increasing involvement with political and military matters in Vietnam, which was split between the communist North and anti-communist South in 1954. This lesson will address the U.S. government’s economic and tactical support of the conflict in Vietnam, and atrocities committed by American troops against Vietnamese civilians, which later became public.

Grades 6-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
On April 30, 1975, the Fall of Saigon marked the end of the Vietnam War, with the communist North taking over the anti-communist South, and unifying the country into the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The end of the war resulted in a large-scale migration of nearly 130,000 refugees fleeing communist rule and retaliation in the Indochina region, to the United States. Over the next twenty years, a total of three million people would flee Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos.

Grades 8-12
Subject: English Language Arts, U.S. History
In this lesson, students will consider the importance of learning ethnic studies in the classroom and engaging with the lived experiences of their own families and communities, particularly as people of color. They will also learn and discuss concepts of intergenerational trauma in the context of mass incarceration and its effects on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders by examining the ROOTS (Restoring Our Original True Selves) program at San Quentin State Prison.

HELPLINES

Our helplines prioritize assistance to low-income persons in the following areas of law: discrimination, family, immigration, public benefits, employment, housing, and civil rights. 

English: 888.349.9695
中文: 800.520.2356
한글: 800.867.3640
Tagalog: 855.300.2552
ภาษาไทย: 800.914.9583
Tiếng Việt: 714.477.2958

 

Our mission is to advocate for civil rights, provide legal services and education, and build coalitions to positively influence and impact Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders and to create a more equitable and harmonious society.